Riparia Resources

Nautical Photography

General Photography

Boat Building

Rachel Dinghy

40 Ft. Ketch

Overview

40 ft Ketch

Current Status

Last Plank Party

(The Viking's Lair)

The Great

Hull Moving

Turnover

(A Tight Squeeze)

Keel Pouring

Finish

Testing Panels

Riparia Boat Building

Finish Testing Panels

I've recently started setting up panels to test various types of exterior finish.

Port Orford Cedar Deck Finish

also see: Oregon White Oak brightwork (separate page)

What finish will seal and stabilize a Port Orford Cedar deck overlay, perhaps harden it's surface, maintain a good traction surface and remain light in color? Traditionally softwood decks have been sealed with a mixture of turpentine, linseed oil and pine tar in about 1:1:1 ratio. This makes a good surface but it turns very dark or black. I'd like my deck to be lighter. Panels were set up to to campare options. This was second growth POC with only about 4 rings to the inch. It's from wind break trees that died on my property presumably from Phytophthora lateralis an introduced root fungus that threatens the trees, especially along streams.

#1 Thompson's water seal (TWS) #2 Pure Tung oil/Turpentine (mixed 1:1) (PTO) #3 Boiled Linseed oil/Turpentine (mixed 1:1) (BLO). Note the (fairly faint) penciled numbers at the top and the vertical dividing lines (again faint but #1 contains about 2 3/4 planks, #2 containts a bit of the 3rd plank, the next 3 planks and a bit of the 7th, #3 contains most of th 7th plank and all of the 8th and 9th. The dividing lines were intentionally not on the seams.

Exposure is to Portland, Oregon rainy temperate climate, occasional winter snow, SW exposure at about a 15 degree angle to horizontal. Exposure rack is shown on the Oregon White Oak page.

A few days after exposing this to the sun, I added another variable, Pine Tar (PT). I'm using Imprex Light Pine tar made in Sweden by Auson. This can be purchased direct from Noxudol in California or indirectly from them through Amazon.com and others. It's lighter and more liquid than other pine tars, which I think suits my needs. It's also cheaper than some heavier, darker versions of pine tar.

Another variable is that the seams in the upper half are filled with Epoxy (Gougeon 105/205) and sanding dust, whereas the lower half has seams of hardware store black polyurethane caulking. I didn't do a great job with this and ideally the epoxy should have graphite in it to prevent UV degradation and the polyurethane should be something like 3M 5200 but at least I'll see how the cheaper stuff stands up with time and whether either separate from the cedar over time and seasonal changes. Nail holes are visible from temporary nailing while epoxying the planks to plywood.

POCbare82710
POCbeforePT
August 26, 2010
August 26, 2010
POC98101
POC9310
Sept 10, 2010
Sept. 3, 2010
POC919101
POC9810sheen
Sept 10, 2010
Sept. 19, 2010
POC919103
POC919102
On the left see the
POC2102010
POC12110
Dec. 1, 2010
Oct 20, 2010
POC1311
POCsheen1311
Jan. 3, 2011
POC2111
Feb 1, 2011
POC2111degradecu
POC3611
Mar. 6, 2011
Mar. 23, 2011
POC323112 POC323113

Riparia Resources

Nautical Photography

General Photography

Boat Building

Rachel Dinghy

40 Ft. Ketch

Overview

Last Plank Party

(The Viking's Lair)

The Great

Hull Moving

Turnover

(A Tight Squeeze)

Keel Pouring

Current Status