Riparia Resources

Nautical Photography

General Photography

Boat Building

Rachel Dinghy

40 Ft. Ketch

Overview

40 ft Ketch

Current Status

Last Plank Party

(The Viking's Lair)

The Great

Hull Moving

Turnover

(A Tight Squeeze)

Keel Pouring

Finish

Testing Panels

Riparia Boat Building

Turning over the hull

After the hull was moved it took several months to build a tin-roofed shed over the hull. With tarp sides I'm open to ambient temperatures, but at least I'm dry. This is rather important in Oregon.

I sheathed the hull with 3 layers of 10 oz. fiberglass cloth and then filled and faired until hands and eyes could not find need for improvement.

The turning process had been figured out years before, but now I was severely constrained in space and my shed didn't have the strength of a commercial pole building.

The hull is 11 ft. 2 in. beam, the greatest diagonal of the hull is almost 12 ft. and the shed width between the posts is less than 14 ft.

Turning day was 9/9/05. Friends were gathered far and near, and fed pizza, pop and beer.

 

 

The basic plan was to lift the hull in a sling. Four rented two ton chain hoists were used. The chain falls on the starboard side would go down to the sheer, cross over to the port side and attach to the sheer there. Where the chain rounded the sheer, it was protected by an L-shaped block of wood. On the port side, the fall went directly down to the sheer and attached. One side would be lifted while the other was let down and the hull would slowly turn over.

I made weldments to slip over the ends of 4x4 posts from which to lift. A post with crude pyramidal 2x4 bracing was placed both sides, fore and aft. They were linked together below the hull with another 2x4. Other weldments hooked over the sheer on the port side. They were wedged in place and the hoists hooked to them. These weldments proved the weak point. The 'hook' was a U-shaped trough bent of steel plate that was, I think, 5/16" thick. This was not rigid enough and the U started to flare out during the lift. If should've been built with external buttressing to make it more rigid and better wedged to the hull, or it should've been through bolted at the sheer, at least forward. This weakness caused some shifting of the fitting requiring the hull to be set down forward in mid turn to readjust things. (It was set on simple padding, e.g. boat cushions.) The slippage problem was aggravated by the difficulty of synchronizing forward and aft lifting due to the difference in hull circumference.

The other problem that occurred was the expected lack of lifting height. This was solved by a gin-pole to the keelson.

Overall, the turnover went fairly smoothly and lookie-loos were remarking, "I'll be damned, it's going to work."

Aframe

Here's the hoisting fitting

And the Sheer Fitting

hoist

sheerfitting

Lifting Away

A gin pole gave extra lifting height.

Lift1

ginpole

Half Way Over

Almost Over

Halfturn

Almostover

It's Done!

And the stern view (Nice ass!)

Donebow

donestern

Riparia Resources

Nautical Photography

General Photography

Boat Building

Rachel Dinghy

40 Ft. Ketch

Overview

40 ft Ketch

Current Status

Last Plank Party

(The Viking's Lair)

The Great

Hull Moving

Turnover

(A Tight Squeeze)

Keel Pouring

Finish

Testing Panels